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, this is a dangerous and misguided effort that will cause disaster for our economy and for our environment. so that is why it's been labeled "prop f." [ [ laughter ] [ applause ] so please make sure that you help us to defeat that some people are suggesting that we can tear down our hetch hetchy dam and get enough water for our businesses and residents and i tell you there is absolutely no way. that is all that is on ballot and let's look forward to what we're doing on our major development projects. as mentioned by joan earlier, four cities, 5m will preserve the iconic chronicle building, convert four acres of underutilized parking lots and industrial structures into an urban mixed-use campus. thank you, alexa arenas for taking this ground breaking project and making sure that the innovative companies that are the life blood of our city are taken care and thank you very much for joining us this morning. [ applause ] the moscone expansion project "[ys3xconventi center remains the linchpin of our city's tourism and thank you for working with us. along the waterfront, mixed use developments are
this opportunity to kind of examine what is going on in our real estate environment, and in particular, to thank the san francisco business times for putting on this event. and i think for most of us in this room, we rely very heavily on the san francisco business times to keep track of what is going on in san francisco, and the greater bay area, in the real estate world. and it is the best source of that information for all of us. mary asked me if i would make a few observations about the general state of the real estate economy here in san francisco and as i do that, i always have to think about what to say that mary hasn't already said about it. and if you look at the real estate economy generally in our nation, and the fact that it is still soft. that we still need more jobs. that there is a recovery, but it's a slow recovery. you can't do that without thinking gee, will i sound like a politician for one or the other major political parties? and so i will steer clear of that and focus instead on san francisco and maybe we're living in a bubble, but it's a pretty wonderful bubble to be living
. the romantic past that meander up and down the park under pines and eucalyptus. hang out in this environment and you might see butterflies it, fennel, and then the lines. -- dandelions. is ada accessible. public transit is plentiful. we have conquered the steps, we have watched the dogs, and we have enjoyed a beautiful view. this is a place to take someone special on a romantic stroll and enjoyed a beautiful look out. welcome to corona heights located in the heart of this district. it offers a view of the downtown skyline, the bay bridge, and the east bay. it is one of the best kept secrets in the city. it is hardly ever crowded. on any given day, you will run into a few locals. , bought a 37 bus to get there without any parking worries. for legged friends can run freely. there is also a patch of grass for the small box. >> it is a great place. it is a wonderful place to have these kinds of parks. that dog owners appreciate it. >> take time to notice of the wildfires that are on the grassland and keep your head out on the lookout for hawks and other bird life. be sure to take your camera and
to enjoy the environment. this is our future generations so we have to have the best ideas. how to keep our environment and our strong. i want to tell you that there are a tremendous amount of enthusiasm for keeping our city grain trade we have at least three different projects that we have been focused on for a number of years. i have had the privilege with working with mohammed and our city engineers to accomplish this. most importantly with our community leaders and volunteers throughout every part of our neighborhoods. i hope that you do you is your time and take advantage of our wonderful weather to go out and do as many doors as possible of all the -- tours as possible of all the community gardens. we have a committee challenge program, one that i am proud to have headed up when we were at public works but also the city administrator. this program today funds almost $900,000 this year in programs that are all committee pushed. it is attacks checkoff for corporations and individuals. the fund this through the tax system to provide almost $1 million every year and is put into a communit
the environment. katie marzullo joins us from brook field elementary to explain how. >> reporter: there's plenty of reading, writing and arithmetic taught here. the students are also learning hands-on, how to care for their environment. the school day starts with breakfast in the 4th grade class. it is what happens after breakfast that is special. >> we just put our breakfast in the right bins that shows the pictures. >> reporter: no trash chance they meticulously separate waste in the classroom and in the cafeteria so that nothing goes to waste. >> they understand the environment stays clean and by composting and separating they help the environment. >> reporter: part of green gloves program. nearly half of the schools in the oakland unified district are participating and in doing so the district is diverting more than 41% of solid waste from the landfill. >> we take the scraps and take them to a recycling facility and create compost and return that back to the schools for their gardens. we close the loop. >> reporter: the students reap benefits in their gardens. the program is in its second ye
headquarters today. the >>> oakland students earning a's in helping the environment. katie marzullo joins us from brook field elementary to explain how. >> reporter: there's plenty of reading, writing and arithmetic taught here. the students are also learning hands-on, how to care for their environment. the school day starts with breakfast in the 4th grade class. it is what happens after breakfast that is special. >> we just put our breakfast in the right bins that shows the pictures. >> reporter: no trash chance they meticulously separate waste in the classroom and in the cafeteria so that nothing goes to waste. >> they understand the environment stays clean and by composting and separating they help the environment. >> reporter: part of green gloves program. nearly half of the schools in the oakland unified district are participating and in doing so the district is diverting more than 41% of solid waste from the landfill. >> we take the scraps and take them to a recycling facility and create compost and return that back to the schools for their gardens. we close the loop. >> reporter: the
of integrating art into the airport environment with the addition of five new commissions that are as bold and dynamic as the new building. >> this project was completed in record time, and we were able to integrate the artist's early enough in the process that they could work with the architect said that the work that is completed is the work that really helps complement and instill the space as opposed to being tucked away in a corner. >> be experience begins with the glass facades that was designed with over 120 laminated glass panels. it captures the experience of being under or over clouds when flying in a plane. depending on the distance or point of view, it can appear clear for more abstract and atmospheric. the subtle colors change gradually depending on the light and the time of day. >> i wanted to create an art work that looks over time as well as working on in the first glance. the first time you come here, you may not see a. but you may be able to see one side over the other. it features a couple of suspended sculptures. each was created out of a series of flat plains run paral
and danger by making it erasing truck. for our goal is to make it safer and better environment for all. third, we are not targeting the center the problem. which is the speeding traffic. because most accidents happen from the reckless drivers that try to beat the traffic lights and where the most accidents happen. fourth, if our goal is really the safety of the pedestrians, we should stress and enforce the drivers who drive on masonic so dangerously to change their direction of alternative streets. by having more force on traffic lights will do the job or have a longer waiting time on masonic traffic lights will help too. that's my suggestion, my idea. finally i am for change. but this is a bad plan, and we need to have a better plan that suits all. and i am for the coalition, bicycles. and i am for the addition of bike lane. but we need to make it safer environment for all. >> edward depalma. >> good afternoon, i am a resident of haight ashbury district. i ride a bicycle everyday and on masonic corridor on a regular basis. and it's incredibly unsafe and i feel threatened and i am sad to say,
years ago. the environment is huge. it is stronger than willpower. surrounding yourself with artists, being in a culture where artists are driving, and where a huge amount of them is a healthy environment. >> you are making it safer. push, push. that is better. when i start thinking, i see it actually -- sometimes, i do not see it, but when i do, it is usually from the inside out. it is like watching something being spawned. you go in, and you begin to work, excavate, play with the dancers, and then things began to emerge. you may have a plan that this is what i want to create. here are the ideas i want to play with, but then, you go into the room, and there maybe some fertile ideas that are becoming manifest that are more interesting than the idea you had initially set out to plan. so there has to be this openness for spontaneity. also, a sense that regardless of the deadline, that you have tons of time so the you can keep your creativity alive and not cut it off and just go into old habits. it is a lot like listening. really listening to watch what is going to emerge. i like this t
not communicate with the officers. they are in a precarious situation. they worked at a much closer environment and they cannot be perceived as a snitch. or that they are working with the police department. they are there to, down, emotionally, the anchor. what they do then, we have a shooting war homicide. and they go to the hospital to be with the families. any talk of retaliation -- they will work with our social workers at the hospital. and whether the retaliation must go next. to saturate and prevent and interrupt any violence that may occur. this is a component or peace that has been building. i polled the captains of payview, mission, ingleside and the northern district. these are the most affected by gang violence. they said they appreciated what the crn did what they want to see them more. they need to fill that communication. it also comes down to training and trust, to be able to have them talk to officers. they would address the officers, they had arrested some of them, when there were actually under. they will help the police and the community. under his guidance we are the most ac
really it increased service to our clients and reduced costs and really improved the bidding environment for our contractors. it's remarkable what she has done. >> been a public service -- being a public servant is a good thing. i love my job. i would never exchange it for anything else in the world. [applause] [applause] >> i am from the department of public works. i have the honor of introducing jocelyn quintos. i will just a real quick, jocelyn works very hard. through her work, a lot of contracts and a lot of work that she does -- she has brought new systems that have saved a lot of tand time and allowed us to give contracts and make payments very fast. please meet jocelyn. [applause] >> first of all, i just want to thank spur and mfac for giving me this honor. i've never really won an award. it does feel like you won the oscars. it's different when you are standing here. i do not even have a written speech. i will speak from the heart. today is a very important day for me and my family because this happens to be my father's death anniversary. i want to dedicate this to my father. my
the country's business environment. he says, japanese firms with high technologies can contribute to the economy. the president expressed his intention to provide maximum support stressing that vietnam is politically stable. officials at atpan chthe japan of commerce say firms in china may switch to vietnam. responding to recent anti-japan demonstrations in china. >>> company executives will launch the new models in japan by march 2013. sharp has commercialized the world's first super high definition lcd panels. they consume 20% of the power compared to previous models. the firm may supply the panels to taiwan's precision industry. sharp is in talks with the taiwanese electronics firm about capital tie-up. sharp aims to turn to the black by showing a net profit in the business year through march 2014. the firm's main creditors, are to offer loans up to a combined total of $2.5 billion. that will raise the bank support to $4.5 billion. >>> now, not exactly a household name. some might find that surprising given his most notable accomplishment. he was working for a research agency u
have seen in years of trading and investing. they have worked in environments in the past. the stocks didn't rally on the weaker projections. more important is the fact that it didn't get crushed as much as it should have. the reaction isn't that note worthy given how wild the stock is. why hasn't it's been benign? remember, we were at 11,000 not that long ago. think about it. instead of the 13,000. we were down 11,000. that is where we are. why were these stucks down before the rise broke out? it hooks like we would be finishing higher for the day. this reminds me of when the greeks went crazy. i think the declines might not have occurred and it pointed to a couple of things. and it makes the market stronger than you would expect and maybe like boundy and not a flood. first they lag their benchmarks and they need to make up ground. the hedge fund managers are expected to beat the s&p 500. where you pay teeny tinie fees. what is the point of giving a manager a share of the profits if they can't do as well as the static machine? as the year ticks by, they are getting frantic. they have
of our preferences or the inability to control our preferences. we are victims of our environments growing up. we are victims of our context that we live in and, therefore, we all, you know, are not "responsible for that behavior and therefore should be mitigating." when you look at the testimony that comes in, whether it's from a mother or from neighbors or from teachers that are talking about really mitigating circumstances, they are the rotten social background kind of arguments, the abuse and the suffering that that individual experienced and those things show up in the brain. the brain is also a sponge. the brain isn't simply created by genetics and it's very much shaped by environment. and so my mentor john monaghan likened the problem of predicting violent people to predicting violent storms. when you think of meteorology, you think of the difficulty of classifying a hurricane and tracking a hurricane, making judgments about such complex behavior that has sort of chaotic premises underlying it, you're going to make lots of mistakes. you're going to make lots of mistakes in b
environment providing a safe and nurturing atmosphere for the families. we feel that the families progress through the program living life on life's terms because they experience everyday living. they take care of their children. they cook for their children. they get their children up to go to school. so the benefit of being in a one-shop model where everything is onsite is such a benefit to the families. i think, overall, the families here at the exodus program respond really well to just the genuine concern that our staff displays to them on a day-to-day basis. one of the things that we try to do as early on as possible is to try to have our clients develop a real positive support system. whether it be through church, through meetings, through other peers that are here at the program, reconnecting with their family members. i think that's definitely the first step. well, having a place to live and being around other families that are like ours is very helpful because i feel like we get to help each other. and it's not just me getting help. i see that i am not alone. i enjoy that all of
've opened up an environment for them where it's okay for them to tell me how they feel and talk about what they experienced during my time of addiction and that-validate their feelings. and that it's okay. and they have learned how to trust and move on and are doing fantastic in school and have just really become amazing children, despite the trauma that they experienced at a young age. and this is a key word, fran, trauma. that is really the main issue here. the notion that the kids are traumatized and the trauma really does take a long time for folks to heal. correct? correct. and trauma has a lot of-there's an extended definition of trauma. we used to think of trauma very narrowly and now we're seeing that both in several different cultures and, in this situation of families with young people living with addictions and mental illness, the trauma can be very subtle and doesn't show up until they are adults. the trauma can be very severe and needs to be intervened with right away. so there are all different levels of trauma, but the good news is we also know so much more and we are-all of
to environmental organizations including the cr club and san francisco department of environment. that outreach garnered four applications. one applicant did withdraw his application before we brought this item to you. in doing so endorsed the application of mr. garcia as well. so with that we are bringing mr. garcia's application to you with recommendation to appoint him to the environmental seat. if i can answer additional questions you may have. >> thank you, bob. i think being that the applicant is here maybe he can say a few words. i want to appreciate the additional outreach for the seat. i know we had expressed, you know, we wanted to see someone with a deeper set of work experience in environmentalism, so we really appreciate the additional outreach. i want to invite mr. garcia to say a few words to the board of directors. >> good morning. my name is mark garcia f i'm here from the greenlining institute in berkeley. * i want to take the time to appreciate you for inviting me in today. i have worked in los angeles and las vegas on environmental outreaches, saving the canyons in red rock
's something i think was an ideal environment for these concepts. it is limited to that geographic area. and i believe firmly that it would be very successful because it would be done with a lot of thoughtful application of these concepts. it won't be with a sledge hammer. >> right. >> on the issue of congestion pricing, there is a larger policy. what i will tell you is this. the environment that we had when we did the mobility and pricing study was such that in addition to hitting a major recession, which is not a great time to be having a conversation about charging anybody more for anything -- >> right. >> we also i believe did not have the region prepared for this. and that is a situation that we often have. we in san francisco tend to lead the charge on ideas that then take some time to mature in the region. the region is also coming along. the region has already, since we did our study, implemented some form of pricing on the bay bridge, for example. where there is a larger charge. i think we are moving in that direction. the technology is improving in terms of collection and detection a
in the last couple of weeks that this is an environment where there is still opportunity for extremist to make trouble. i should point out that our friends on the other side of out like to imagine that if they were in charge, we would be so tough that everyone would understand where we stood and would not be able to protest against us. it is worth noting that the last time these folks were in charge during the george bush administration, there were attacks on u.s. embassies and consulates. it is important to remember that during the reagan administration, there was an attack in which killed americans. these folks let us into the most disastrous for a policy decision in a generation. it in power in iran. it killed more than 4000 americans. it left hundreds of thousands of iraqis dead or displaced. but these folks want us to hand over the keys of foreign policy back to them? the nerve of the individuals " put attention to the worst farm policy disaster and say that the understand the region better is laughable. >> you mentioned syria. there is a lot of pressure for the administration to get invo
environment. what you saw in the suburban flight of the 1960's and 1970's was that after people moved out to the suburbs, so, too, did the companies move out to the suburbs. and i think what you are going to see is increasing pressure, if this is a battle between the employees and the employer about whether given that the employees want to live in san francisco and the employers want to be out where their corporate campuses are. if that is an arm wrestling match, i'm going to bet on the employee, because i think at the end of the day, if you run a major company, and your employee can quit and get off this bus and stop commuting an hour and a half each way each day and skateboard, ride bart, ride muni to work and be at sales force or twitter in 10 or 15 minutes as opposed to riding on the bus for an hour and a half, i think the companies will be forced to increase their footprints in san francisco and i think you will see what is going on demographically as being tremendously important to san francisco in the years ahead. so as we look at this from tishman speyer's perspective, how do we c
figures. the environment is different. we just can't take all of that and apply it widely. reporter: created by the elections in and the fiscal clip at the end of the year, also the debt crisis mirror. cheryl: all right, peter burns, thank you very much. if you are fired up about this or any other issues on the program, send gerri an e-mail at cherry at fox business.com. >> coming up on "the willis report", an electric car that nobody wants to purchase. we spend billions of dollars on your dime. and housing cop and sent prices skyrocketing. would this mean for the market? also, remember when free checking accounts were almost everywhere? not anymore. our financial advisor breaks down what it's costing you and if the services are gone for good. we are on the case next on "willis report" rachel quit the corporate grind to start her own interior design business. she's got a growing list of clients she keeps in touch with using e-mail marketing from constantcontact.com. constantcontact is easy and affordable. it lets her send out updates and photos that showcase her expertise and inspir
of my normal environment. so i think i could be educate thad way. they could see all the colleges in the area. my whole thing was to take them outside of their element and have them be educated in that way. >> we know education is important but the ref rage as it's being called, the nfl releasing a statement just a short time ago, nnamdi, they they're supporting the refs in this game with the packers, what do you think? come on. give it to me straight. >> you're not going to be fined. >> i am going to be fined. you don't know that, tamron. but anyway, no. obviously you never want it to be the play that costs one team or the other in a game. they weren't in the nfl last year, so this is all new to them. >> you're awfully forgiving. >> it's tough. >> you're awfully forgiving and i kind of know why because you've got a game against the giants and you don't want a ref against you before you start. >> yeah, you figured it out. >> troy aikman said this is a joke. we know your position as a quarterback. i said earlier that could have been you and the bad call against you. >> yeah, you're
that's failed. second, being protecting people and the environment is a core value. we are taking all appropriate actions to address issues to prevent a similar recurrence from happening again. and the third that we're continuing to operate with the investigation agency. >> and there is governor jerry brown signed several bills into law including three addressing a deadly pipeline explosion from two years ago. the bills sponsored from assemblyman jerry hill saying they put the public utilities commission on notice they must improve overnight. first requires utilities commissioned to adopt safety regulations. and other two give more power regulate bonuses at utility companies. >> hundreds of workers rallied for bill of rights today outside of the state capitol. housekeepers and nannies delivered a petition with 25,000 signatures and urging them thoim sign a measure providing them with basics such as overtime and meal breaks this makes it so all domestic workers if you're caring for elderly or peoples' children they're able to have the rights you that need. >> governor brown has 10 days
there are byproducts. one is low kreeyields. >> regulators keep saying because of the low yield environment, buy more bonds because they now have a pension deficit. that's nonsense, of course. what's happening on the corporate side? they're awash with capital. are we also getting less issuance and how much more money do corporates need to have? >> what's interesting is the eurozone credit market is shrinking year on year which is the first time it's done that for a long time. there's not only less issuance, there's less coming out to meet, retiring effectively. corporates as kelly said earlier, the economic outlook is not rosy. the motivation to carry out m&a activities is relatively low. so i expect the trend to continue. >> and the quality they're issuing isn't all that great either. >> the good quality have all the cash they need. so, you know, they don't need any who are. >> most of them have the cash. i think the good quality borrowers can borrow really easier. there's huge 2k3457demand for h the spreads are tight. >> angela merkel and mario draghi are both delivering speeches in berlin today. o
the important things, they are all from pretty average environments. extremely different in terms of structure. does this go towards mitigation? how should it be used? how should this information be used to? i use it to dole out treatment. that is how i thought we would kick start this seminar. i am happy to answer any other questions. i did not do this all by myself. i had a lot of individuals who helped me with this data. this research is all funded by the national research of health, your tax dollars. thank you for your attention. i will turn over to our moderator. thank you. [applause] >> actually, i would like to, i'm going to ask a few questions, but i was hoping we could get a debate going here rather than with me trying to ask intelligent questions and just have the very smart people just talking amongst themselves to educate us. so one of the questions that we're wanting to talk about today was the idea of free will in terms of the criminal justice system. and i would like to ask each of you, is there a definition of free will in the context of your individual work? we'll start with y
the mammoth tooth, calcium phosphate. it was over laid by sand. the environment changed from a lake to a lagoon to all of a sudden a stream system. so the sediment came in either after the mammoth lost his tooth or passed on. elephants like to lose their teeth. so it is overlaid by capping sand. >> i have a question -- >> question from the director. >> can you tell us what size you are talking about with your fingers? oh really? >> how about showing the picture. we have a picture that will show -- >> it is that big. >> not this? >> no, it is giant. >> jim, if you could address the board when you speak. >> sorry, board. >> if you could speak into the mic because the meeting is recorded. >> that is me holding the tooth, so that is the relative scale. again, that is the side view. >> pretty big. >> there you go. the grinding surface is at the bottom, where they grind leaves and individual table. it is an exciting find for biological purposes, evolutionary purposes, for kids. it is also great for science. if we can get an age out of this mastadon, a mammoth columbi, we will get an age
was confusing for several years. in the end, he chose to change the environment around him, not to change himself. when he entered high school, takamasa made clear his hope of attending as a boy. the school accepted him, a first for the institution. >> translator: takamasa insisted early on that he wanted to come out, so we accepted it and tried to support him as best we can. >> reporter: takamasa's schoolmates have overcome the initial shock and accept him. >> translator: i don't care if he's a boy or a girl. takamasa his own person. >> translator: i'm his friend because takamasa is takamasa. we enjoy boy to boy talk. >> reporter: as some schools open up, the attitudes of medical practitioners are also starting to change. the number of youngsters visiting medical institutions for gid is increasing. so the age of hormone therapy has been lowered from 18 to 15. as a result, 17-year-old takamasa is eligible for treatment. >> translator: since my voice became deeper, i feel i'm starting to become the real me. i'm becoming more outgoing. >> reporter: takamasa has decided to come out and talk
environment. they also can be magnets for crime and litter. now fortunately we have a plan to address these. the first part, you are obviously family with is the tgpa has eliminated a lot of the ramps that previously existed, specifically the east loop to the old transbay terminal that, is gone permanently. that frees a lot of land for development, including open space. there are other ramps not going anywhere, they will be with us forever. specifically, the west ramp to the new transbay transit center and the fremont full son street from interstate 80. * >> what we have been working on since 2003 is a way to turn that negative of these ramps into a positive to, create an active, vibrant set of open space improvements underneath those that will be an amenity for the neighborhood. not a place that attracts negative uses. this is a map just showing the -- >> sorry, mike. could you tell us who cmga is, the boundary line. >> cmg is the design firm we have hired to work on the plan. we hired a team to develop this. i should mention our principle designer, scott, ones able to be here. that is why
". the second study was described in the "new york times" in its environment section on the front page that described data that indicated san francisco bay along the embarcadero may rise 3 feet in the next eight years. the findings of the two studies merit careful consideration of land use questions confronting san francisco. i have described these to the planning department and the port commission and the board of supervisors. approving such significant capital projects should be based on the best and most scientific data preparing against flooding will be expensive, but it is important not to ignore the city's safety based on the most recent data that we have. thank you. >> thank you. is there any additional public comments? seeing none mr. chairman can we close public comment? >> yes. >> okay. public comment is closed. so mr. chairman i move that we forward this to the full board with a positive recommendation. this proposed community safety element went through a very, very lengthy thorough process and public vetting with public hearing and i think it's very, very strong and d
universal experiences. the host creates a welcoming environment for everybody. there is no cultural barrier to entry. >> the demographic of people who come will match the demographic of the reader. it is very simple. if we want more people of color, you book more people of color. you want more women, your book more women. kind of like that. it gets mixed up a little bit. in general, we kind of have a core group of people who come every month. their ages and very. we definitely have some folks who are straight. >> the loyal audience has allowed michelle to take more chances with the monthly lineup. established authors bring in an older audience. younker authors bring in their friends from the community who might be bringing in an older author. >> raider has provided a stage for more than 400 writers. it ranges from fiction to academics stories to academic stories this service the underground of queer fell, history, or culture. >> and there are so many different literary circles in san francisco. i have been programming this reading series for nine years. and i still have a huge list on my co
like, here she comes again. it is a very warm environment. the animals are incredible and the trainers are really special. you would think it would be more tense, but it is a very sweet place to go to work. >> justin, what drew you to this role? >> i had just finished eight seasons of weeds on showtime. it came around. i was not planning on anything, but it was something that was very different from that. it just seemed like i must have been future projecting, because i did not know how great it was going to turn out, which it has. >> it is a pleasure talking with you both, and good luck with the show. >> thank you. >> "animal practice" premieres at 8:00 p.m. tomorrow night. coming up, your maryland lottery numbers and in other check of the forecast. but first, a look at how wall street is performing at this hour. from this west virginia casino. they want marylanders to keep coming to west virginia... casinos like theirs. spending one hundred seventy million a year. question seven will keep those dollars at home. with a limited expansion of gaming that will mean... hundreds of millions
and solutions. and again with the complicated regional and international environment, we have to be very, very careful. we are drawing down of two wars in the middle east, in iraq and afghanistan than many would say at the very least in terms of success and some would characterize as failures, especially into the future. so they have to be very, very careful about interjecting our source. frankly perhaps ultimately if this uprising unworn syria basically can be contained. there needs to be a syrian solution to this. as i said earlier, many of the syrian opposition are as pro-u.s. anyone else's career. we have to be careful about these things. and i think we just can't throw our weight around. as much as we would like to. as much as there seems to be a moral imperative to do so, we don't understand the landscape. we are getting a better idea, but the opposition is so decentralized. there is no coherent group, you know, we could support that we be as i said earlier shooting in the dark to some degree. you know, what would happen in terms of the worst across borders or hezbollah. why would russia
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able to match him in that environment where his brain power may not be that useful in that formal environment. >> look, where did mitt romney make his bone, so to speak. it was bain and company, not bain capital, as consultants. probably great with a power point and wonderful with presentation, boiling information down into nuggets and presenting it in a coherent fashion. i think he'd like to do that without anybody intervening or, you know, interrupting. when you see him on the campaign and he starts having to talk like a normal person and interacting with people, it almost always throws him and he starts saying who knows what. so i think, you know, he'll have his presentations but if you watched the interview last night with scott pelley, he still can't speak in depth about budget cuts, tax deductions he wants to limit, and so he's very good at that first index card, but how you get -- what he has to say for the second, third, fourth index card, it's still a problem for him. >> that's the moderator's challenge. get beyond the memorized material. no one can question on whether th
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a couple of ozen americans into a brittle environment back in benghazi into that compound is something that would be pretty tough to tcure. se they keep saying we're srking on it. e opelley: we saw evidence of that in liz's piece just then. s wonder, have the libyans said no to the f.b.i.? that they're not allowed to go there? n you worked in the region there. nobody ever says no to a guest. what they say is "we're working very hard to get you what you went, tomorrow, tomorrow, tomorrow." wnd there's no reason to doubt their sincerity that they will get them a crime scene in benghazi, which is obviously compromised. but a lot of the action in tripoli, the witnesses who were there, the intelligence officials, the government officials they need to be dealing with so they're getting plenty done but they need to get there. >> pelley: john, thank you very much. president obama made his remarks in new york today. he was in new york for the united nations general assembly meeting. 1re than 120 world leaders are in town for that, but the president is not scheduled to meet with any of them. nan
into account a population that creates a robust learning environment because you have robust students. you would agree with that then. >> i do, but if you continue with her statement. >> we can agree on something. >> i think we might agree more than you might think. >> we really don't agree on the voter right thing. >> that's for sure. >> i really appreciate you coming inside the war room, though. i wish we had a little more time, because it would be fun to debate you and serious too for our viewers to hear where we're coming from. >> still more to do tonight in the war room, and a big announcement about tomorrow, all coming up right after the break. >>i jump out of my skin at people when i'm upset. do you share the sense of outrage that they're doing this, this corruption based on corruption based on corruption. >>i think that's an understatement, eliot. u>> i'm not prone tot. understatement, so explain to me why that is. i think the mob learned from wall st., not vice versa. >> it is so hard to believe that it's been over five months since rick santorum became the last candidate to offic
that is not easy but it's not impossible. we would like to provide the environment for the people of syria so their representative cans sit down together and we can help them to bring back their souls and their lives, normal lives, real lives and how the people can become able to choose the leadership and this is going to take some effort and some time. if we have good will and good intentions and we agree on the principles and the regime agrees to the will of the international community. when they meet this is not going to be impossible after that. >> rose: back to egypt many people have wondered what it would be like when you see a government in which the muslim brotherhood had won politically. what it would be like to have islamist governments in power in egypt. what should they expect? >> people in egypt made their choice, chose their way: freedom real democratic change, the stable political construction of the-- a country. the independence of the executive and legal branch and administrative branch. we are now working together on the constitution that will be presented to the people in t
, cultural sit-down environment with the option or flavor of vibrant live entertainment. i do know that there is a concern for loud noise and security issues. but i believe that that's all been addressed and dealt with, with the local neighbors. again, i thank you for your time, commissioners. it would be my pleasure if you would all support and approve, keeping the -- experience legacy and live and grant the entertainment permit. thank you. >> president fong: thank you. >> thank you. my name is dan al lard. i'm here today to pledge my support for the restaurant and the baros family. i am very familiar with the restaurant as it was one of the first restaurants i ever went to when i first moved to the city about 25 years ago. i found it to be a lively place. the food was great. and the band played a very integral part in making it such a fun atmosphere. i met the owners, and in discussions about their business i find them to be serious and determined business people, with great sensitivity and compassion for the neighborhood and for the city of san francisco. if given the privilege
thinking outside of the box. it is an environment as challenging as this one. >> take advantage of the tax breaks. >> tlur tax brehere are tax bre small business owners. auto expenses travel expenses start up costs shths professional fees legal fees. maximize all of this some you can actually control. >> thank you so much. i know people out there appreciate the tips today. >>> the time now is 25 after the top of the hour. coming up a freedom of religion fight breaking out in one town. it is all in an effort to keep prayer at town meetings. new reports showing more and more teacher's unions are ditching the democratic party to throw their support behind republicans. >>> but first on this day in history back in 1970 remember this one, vera? patti ann. the partridge family premiered on tv. >> welcome back to "fox & friends first". i am patti ann browne. >> i am heather childers. thank you for joining us. it is half past the hour. that means it is time for your 5@5:30. the top five stories making news for you at this hour. troops spoiling an insider attack against u.s. forces in afghanistan. t
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